Marine Pollution

Marine Pollution

The Problem

Marine pollution is one of the biggest threats to our oceans health. Pollution, particularly plastics, is found almost everywhere causing ingestion or entanglement of marine wildlife, microplastics are appearing in our food chain and bathing water quality continues to decline. Marine pollutants take considerable time, often centuries, to breakdown, contributing to a continual decline of the health of local wildlife. 

    Key Aims

    We aim to understand the issue through collecting information about the types and scale of pollutants, work with others to target pollution at source and improve waste disposal on land and at sea, and work with regulatory bodies to influence licencing of pollutant discharge and condition of local bathing waters.

    By engaging in forums and working with volunteers and those who use the sea we are beginning to address local issues.

    We are currently running the below projects to help tackle marine pollution.

    Waves of Waste

    A project which supports volunteers to undertake beach cleans across Yorkshire’s beaches. During each beach clean we record litter collected, feed it into a national database collected by the Marine Conservation Society and locally analyse the information to determine trends occurring. If you would like to take part in a beach clean, search our events page for one happening near you!
     

    Fishing 4 Litter

    A project which supports Yorkshire fishermen to understand the issues associated with litter, promotes responsible disposal of fishing waste on land and collection of litter found at sea. Participating fishing vessels receive hard wearing bags to collect litter as part of normal fishing activities. Full bags are emptied into a dedicated bin or skip on the quayside or in compounds.

    To get involved in either of these projects or register an interest in your local angling club hosting a Fishing 4 Litter bin contact us on 01904 659570, livingseas@ywt.org.uk

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    (c) Chris Goldberg